Turns out, you can’t cook, you never went to the gym, and you don't read magazines. Whatever it is, it’s no longer useful, and you need to know how to cancel a subscription. The problem is, you have no idea to start!

Whether it’s something you don’t need or don’t use anymore, or it’s a something you completely forgot you subscribed too, canceling a subscription usually isn’t a big deal. But, “usually” doesn’t mean “always.” Sometimes, learning how to cancel a subscription turns into an epic struggle to figure out how to cancel a subscription that doesn’t want to cancel.

Keep Track!

Netflix account

Image via flickr

It’s easy to lose track of subscriptions, especially if you’re no longer using the service or product. It could be that gym membership. Or, it could be that you got married and you’re using your spouse’s Netflix account.


We’re not pointing fingers (unless we point them at ourselves!), but not everyone thoroughly checks their bank or credit card statements every month. We give it a casual once over and if it looks “about right” we figure everything is fine.


That’s good for the merchant but bad for us. The merchant doesn’t care if you use their service or not, so they’ll keep billing until you get around to canceling. Sometimes subscriptions auto-renew and we didn’t even realize it. Or, we meant to cancel the subscription, but life got in the way, and we never got around to it. Worse, we thought it was canceled, but somehow that subscription came back to haunt us!

Audit yourself

Don’t lose track again

Remind, remind, remind

Put all your eggs in one basket

How to Cancel a Subscription

person holding remote pointing at TV

Image via Unsplash

With your audit complete, you’re ready to learn how to cancel a subscription. Great! There’s really nothing to it. Mostly.


That’s not as ominous as it sounds. Most reputable merchants want happy customers. And, more importantly, they don’t want to create angry ex-customers, so it’s usually pretty painless to figure out how to cancel a subscription.

Terms and conditions

Contact the company

When you can’t contact the merchant

When you use your bank account

Keep an eye out for zombies

Be social

Try the FTC or CFPB

Canceling the Subscription May Not Be Enough

Terms and Condition

Image via flickr

Just because you managed to get the charges stopped doesn’t mean you’re off the hook. Remember those terms and conditions? You may need to also cancel the contract with the merchant to fully cancel your subscription.


Depending on the specifics, you may still be on the hook for part of or even all of the subscription. For example, if you agreed to pay for a 12-month subscription, but it’s only month 10, you may still need to pay the remaining 2 months per the agreement. It just depends on the specifics of your contract.

Subscriptions Make Life Easy but Don’t Let Them Take Over

Subcription

Image via flickr

Subscriptions are a super-easy way to pay for something over time. As long as you keep paying, you get the benefits of a subscription. But, it’s easy to lose track of subscriptions, and suddenly, you’re paying hundreds of dollars for something you don’t want or need anymore.


That’s why keeping track of your subscriptions is just as important as knowing how to cancel a subscription you no longer want (or need!). Reputable companies make it easy, painless even, to cancel. Less than reputable companies make it a little harder. But, fortunately, there are steps you can take to deal with those companies.


So, go start that audit and cancel those unwanted subscriptions!


Tell us your subscription canceling horror stories in the comment section below!

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